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Galderma

Dysport DREAM Study

Galderma Laboratories

June 2020

A twice-yearly treatment schedule of Dysport® injections in the glabellar region was evaluated for subject satisfaction, efficacy, and safety to reflect real-world treatment frequencies.

High subject satisfaction was achieved with twice-yearly treatments of Dysport®with median time to onset of 2 days, long duration, and low reports of adverse events.

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Facial expressions affect photo comparability

Lisette Hilton

3/18/2019

Researchers report in a new study that 16 facial expressions and head positions significantly impact malar and jowl volumes, with smiling and frowning having the biggest effects. Facial volume changes from expressions can look like results seen from aesthetic facial rejuvenation procedures.

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New Dysport injection technique

Lisette Hilton

2/25/2019

Researchers using a new technique for injecting abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport, Galderma) to treat glabellar lines found it might be more likely to result in patient satisfaction than the conventional approach, according to a study published in the February 2019 Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

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Aesthetics Complications Guidelines

Aesthetics Complications Author Group

June 2018

The ACE Group developed a series of evidence-based, peer-reviewed guidelines that cover complications that can occur in nonsurgical aesthetic practices. The objective of this series is to help dermatologists and other physicians performing aesthetic procedures identify and manage these potential complications. Each guideline was produced after a vast literature review by leading experts in the United Kingdom. We hope these guidelines help raise treatment standards within the medical community and ensure early diagnosis and appropriate management of complications, ultimately improving outcomes for our patients.

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The efficacy and complications of a new technique of Abobotulinum-toxin A (Dysport) injection in patients with glabellar lines

Esmat Karbassi MD, Nouzar Nakhaee MD, Maryam Zamanian PhD

2/10/2018

Botulinum toxin has many applications in medicine. In dermatology, it is most frequently used for the treatment of frown lines approved by US food and drug administration.1,2 This neurotoxin protein acts at the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting the release of acetylcholine into the nerve endings, which causes weaken the contraction of the facial muscles and consequently result in the decrease in…

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Outcomes of Polydioxanone Knotless Thread Lifting for Facial Rejuvenation

Dong Hye Suh, MD, PhD, Hee Won Jang, MD, Sang Jun Lee, MD, PhD, Won Seok Lee, MD, and Hwa Jung Ryu, MD, PhD

6/1/2015

The process of aging changes the shape, texture, and color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by uneven descent and laxity of the skin and soft tissues. Texture is primarily determined by fine wrinkles and pores of the skin.

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The First Case Report of a Systemic Allergy to OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) in a Healthy Patient

Lorne King Rosenfield, MD, FACS; Dean George Kardassakis, MD, FACP; Kristen Anne Tsia; and Grace Stayner

7/1/2014

OnabotulinumtoxinA, also known as Botox Cosmetic (Allergan, Inc, Irvine, California), is the most commonly injected substance to diminish the appearance of facial wrinkles; it functions cholinergically by relaxing the muscles surrounding the injection site. Botox Cosmetic is a purified version of a toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

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Pushing Back the Clock

Natausha Spears, RN

6/1/2014

Natuasha Spears, RN, IAFA Board Member and internationally certified injectable trainer recently had an article published in Thrive Oklahoma, Sept/Oct 2014, Volume 5-Issue 5, page 42 entitled “Pushing Back the Clock”.

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Blood Facial…Is it right for you?

Natausha Spears, RN

6/1/2014

Due to the rise in lifestyle education and wider availability, the platelet rich plasma or PRP facial has become very popular lately.

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Hyaluronic Acid Gel Distribution Pattern in Periocular Area With High-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging

Alice S. Goh, MBBS, MS; Jocelyne C. Kohn, MD; Daniel B. Rootman, MD, MSc; Joseph L. Lin, MD; Robert A. Goldberg, MD

2/5/2014

High-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) imaging has been used to study the anatomy and dynamic soft tissue relationships of the periocular area (Figure 1). With the ability to reveal expansible changes such as fat prolapse or fluid accumulation, HRUS has been proven to be a useful tool in defining and improving the outcomes of periocular rejuvenation.

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Triple-blind, prospective, internally controlled comparative study between abobotulinumtoxina and onabotulinumtoxina for the treatment of facial rhytids

Ramtin Kassir, Aparanjita Kolluru, Martin Kassir

8/16/2013

OnabotulinumtoxinA (ONA) has been used since the early 1980s for reducing muscle spasms in medical illnesses. Over the past 20 years, ONA has been recognized by regulatory authorities in approximately 80 countries worldwide as an effective treatment for 21 different medical uses including strabismus, blepharospasm, cervical dystonia, and severe primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Its use as a cosmetic agent..

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A Blanching Technique for Intradermal Injection of the Hyaluronic Acid Belotero

Patrick Micheels, M.D., Didier Sarazin, M.D., Stéphanie Besse, M.D., Hema Sundaram, M.D., Timothy C. Flynn, M.D.

4/30/2013

Anatomically, the dermis is divided into two clearly distinguished parts: the papillary dermis and the reticular dermis. The papillary dermis, located between the basal layer of the epidermis and the reticular dermis, has a different fibrillar structure from the reticular dermis. In the papillary dermis…

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Filler injections with the blunt-tip microcannula compared to the sharp hypodermic needle

Luc Dewandre MD, Caroline Caperton MD,MSPH, James Fulton MD,PhD

9/1/2012

Injectable fillers have become popular cosmetic procedures with more than one million injections done annually. These augmentations are usually performed with hypodermic needles, often supplied with the product. Numerous problems maybe associated with needles…

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Induction of Dermal Collagenesis, Angiogenesis, and Adipogenesis in Human Skin by Injection of Platelet-Rich Fibrin Matrix

Anthony P. Sclafani, MD; Steven A. McCormick, MD

10/17/2011

Since the time of pare, modern surgical care has relied on optimization of local tissue conditions to allow wounds to heal unimpeded. With an improved understanding of the effects of local growth factors, surgeons have begun to manipulate the wound environment to promote more rapid and effective healing.

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Platelet-rich plasma induces increased expression of G1 cell cycle regulators, type I collegen, and matrix metalloproteinase -1 in human skin fibroblasts

Jae-We Cho, Sung-Ae Kim, Kyu-Suk Lee

9/9/2011

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a blood-derived fraction containing at least 100 thousand platelets (1). In clinical applications PRP has been used to facilitate bone proliferation in nonunion fractures of joint replacement of orthopedic surgery, regeneration of periodontal ligaments, and to accelerate the wound healing process in diabetic ulcers (2-4). However, the…

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Rapid Healing and Reduced Erythema after Ablative Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser Resurfacing Combined with the Application of Autologous Platelet-rich Plasma

Jung-Im Na, MD, Jee-Woong Choi, MD, Hye-Ryung Choi, PHD, Jeong-Bok Jeong, MSC, Kyoung-Chan Park, MD, PHD, Sang-Woong Youn, MD, PHD, and Chang-Hun Huh, MD, PHD

4/1/2011

The introduction of fractional thermolysis revolutionized laser surgery, and this concept is now widely applied to various laser devices. Using a nonablative erbium-doped 1,550-nm laser, the creation of microcolumns of coagulation has been reported, leaving untreated skin between the treated columns. Because epidermal integrity is preserved, and…

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Face and Neck Revitalization With Platelet-rich Plasma (PRP): Clinical Outcome in a Series of 23 Consecutively Treated Patients

Alessio Redaelli MD, Domenico Romano MD, Antonio Marciano MD

5/1/2010

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Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for improvement of deep nasolabial folds

Anthony P Sclafani, MD, FACS

10/25/2009

Over 4.5 million nonsurgical procedures were performed in the US in 2008 for skin rejuvenation. Volume deficiency in areas of deeper folds, such as the nasolabial folds (NLFs), typically is treated with injectable dermal fillers. Disadvantages include the transient effects of…

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The Risk of Alar Necrosis Associated with Dermal Filler Injection

LISA DANIELLE GRUNEBAUM, MD, INJA BOGDAN ALLEMANN, MD, STEVEN DAYAN, MD, STEPHEN MANDY, MD, AND LESLIE BAUMANN, MD

10/1/2009

Soft tissue augmentation with temporary dermal fillers is a fast-expanding field and has become an integral part of many aesthetic physicians’ practices. According to the American Academy of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, 1,448,716 people received hyaluronic acid (HA) injections from plastic surgeons in 2007.

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Avoiding dermal filler complications

Richard N. Sherman, MD

3/18/2009

Soft-tissue volume loss, particularly in the orbital and malar areas, is one of the hallmarks of the aging face. Age related volume loss, increased skin laxity, fat loss and redistribution, and diminished support from underlying muscle and bone result in the observable and sometimes profound changes seen in the aging face. These changes may manifest clinically…

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A New Classification of Lip Zones to Customize Injectable Lip Augmentation

Andrew A. Jacono, MD

1/1/2008

The lips are an essential component of facial symmetry and aesthetics. Anthropometric studies have shown that wider and fuller lips in relation to facial width as well as greater vermilion height are a mark of female attractiveness.

Thick Skin

Analysis of Facial Skin Thickness: Defining the Relative Thickness Index

Richard Y. Ha, M.D., Kimihiro Nojima, M.D., William P. Adams, Jr., M.D., and Spencer A. Brown, Ph.D.

10/1/2004

The determination of human skin thickness has been achieved through various methods, both in vivo and in vitro. Ultrasound and histometric analyses have been the most commonly used. However, absolute values of epidermal and dermal thicknesses have demonstrated variability among the different modalities, leaving questions regarding the ability to standardize or compare results of different studies.